Monthly Archives: September 2016

Canada’s Great War Album: Submit Your Story

Canada’s Great War Album wants your story to be told. Use this link to upload pictures, letters and the story of your family member who served in World War One. Teachers, use this as an opportunity to have students write for an authentic audience and preserve history.

I have a writing job to do too. I will be sending what I have to share about my paternal grandfather and his role in WWI.

fred-florence-gosney

Pte. Frederick and Florence Gosney
Married January 22, 1918.

Non-fiction texts for history teachers

The Canada’s History site offers teachers a wealth of non-fiction, primary source documents to use with your students. There is very interesting reading about the POWs and internees of the First World War.

Read about the ingenuity of POWs and how they requested items using hidden messages and code words to help with their escape attempts from POW camps in Germany.

Use these articles as mentor texts with groups of students to work on strategies to decode the text.

PBS: Electoral Central – American Election explored

PBS has created an incredibly comprehensive set of interactive resources for Gr. 7-12 history teachers to help you teach about the American Presidential Election.

The resources include:

Daily Seat Work Viewing

Many classrooms have data projectors in their rooms. Introduce your students to spectacular vistas and interesting videos during their start of day seat work by viewing Vimeo’s drone videos. Teachers can Sign-up with Vimeo to receive the Vimeo newsletter with their staff’s top picks to share with your students.

Mapping Data- Metrocosm

I came across a fascinating website that has loads of information about statistics and the world we live in – Metrocosm. You could spend hours clicking around this site. To start with examine the two centuries of immigration to the United States through this animated graphic. You will be amazed at the change of county base of U.S. immigrants. I did not know that Canadians made up the bulk of immigrants in the early 1900s. Examine the shift of countries of the immigrants over time and think about what was  happening in the world at that time.

This section of the site Puts Canada’s Population in Perspective.

For geographers, cartograms and choropleths are explained. And for the advanced geographers and coders it explains how to make your own cartogram. Are your up for the challenge?